Baffy: Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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Baffy on Friday morning, the day of his surgery. “We wish to thank each & everyone of you who have come forward to help Baffy during his difficult time. Despite a horrible past, we hope he can feel all the love now.” (Photo: Gwen)

“We adopted Baffy from Causes for Animals. No one knew his history. He was found in a forested area with a string around his neck. He must have been tied to a tree and while struggling to get free, hurt his neck badly. Although he was skin and bones, this boy has never shown any aggression to human being or dog. All he does is love unconditionally.

We are sharing Baffy’s story to highlight the plight of pets being abandoned. There is no good reason to give up a pet. You can fail in all the progress of technology and comfort of living, but you cannot fail in being a good human. One with compassion and loyalty. Pets are part of family and they deserve love, respect and most importantly health care from their care giver. The abandoned dogs often suffer in silence and most of them cannot survive in the wild. 

Not all dogs are lucky like Baffy to  get a second chance at life. Baffy now has a family who loves him and his future couldn’t be brighter with so many people rooting for his recovery. If there is anything our dogs teach us, it is to Leave No Man Behind. Whatever life throws at you.” ~ Gwen


Squamous cell carcinomas are malignant cancers originating from the lining cells of the mouth

They are locally invasive and occur mostly in the gums or tonsils. In Baffy’s case, a tumour located in the rostral oral cavity (towards the oral or nasal region) has a lower metastatic rate (lower chance of spreading to other parts of the body).

"About 6 weeks ago, we noticed a lump in Baffy's mouth. It was small and we thought it was an ulcer. When it did not subside, we took him  to the vet for a biopsy. He still seemed healthy but was losing weight." 

“About 6 weeks ago, we noticed a lump in Baffy’s mouth. It was small & we thought it was an ulcer. When it did not subside, we took him to the vet for a biopsy. He still seemed healthy but was steadily losing weight.”

Clinical signs include
  • difficulty eating (especially with tumours in the back of the throat)
  • drooling
  • bleeding from mouth
  • weight loss despite normal appetite
  • displacement or loss of teeth
  • facial swelling
  • swelling under the jaw

A thorough physical examination, complete blood count and biochemical profile were done and chest X-rays taken to determine if the oral tumour has spread. These tumours may provoke an inflammatory reaction that causes pain, and while controlling inflammation may help reduce superficial swelling and pain, it does not cure the cancer. Surgical removal of the tumour is the treatment of choice. 

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Computed tomography (CT) is helpful to define the extent of the tumour before surgery.

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If the tumour has not spread to other locations, surgery is the treatment of choice. Dr Dennis Choi, Mount Pleasant Vet Centre (Gelenggang) prepares to perform rostral mandibulectomy to surgically remove the tumour, including the extensions into underlying tissue & part of the jawbone, together with the incisors & canines.

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Surgery is considered successful if the tumour is completely removed. If the tumour has not spread, surgery is curative & can extend the animal’s life.

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Dogs adapt quite well to partial jaws. They may need to be hand-fed for a period of time before they learn to eat on their own again. Most importantly, they are no longer in pain or discomfort.

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Day after surgery. “Visited our Big Baby Baffy. The nurses said that he has good appetite, vitals are all good but not ready to come home yet. He is happy to see us & made a whole lot of noise when we left. We are very glad he is still his usual naughty self.” (Photo: Gwen)

“With Dr Dennis’ clear explanation of Baffy’s condition, we understand that surgery will save his life, even if it means removing part of his jaw. Otherwise we might have been more paranoid and perhaps too late to help Baffy. It is Dr Dennis’ confidence that helped us make the right decision for Baffy.

Baffy is now back home enjoying meat balls and soft foods, knocking everything down with his cone! Almost back to his usual self. We cannot be more thankful. Never give up on your pets, especially when they are ill. They need us even more then.” ~ Gwen

4 july 2016
You know what they say when you have been so near death that when u have been given a chance to live again, you just keep counting your blessings and live day by day to the fullest? It's all true. Baffy is as of today 45 days cancer free, and he is living his every moment to the fullest by being the naughtiest he could be. But we will take all the naughtiness at any moment. We want to Thank you for loving him!

“You know what they say about being so near death that when you are given a chance to live again, you just keep counting your blessings & live day by day to the fullest? It’s all true.
Baffy is 45 days cancer free & he is living every moment to the fullest by being the naughtiest he can be.”

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“But we will take all the naughtiness at any moment. We want to thank you for loving him!”

4 NOVEMBER 2016 

Like time and tide, cancers wait for no man. In May, Baffy went through rostral mandibulectomy to remove an oral tumour. He lost part of his lower jaw but is no longer in pain, and happier and more energetic than ever. His family’s prompt decision has added many good days to this big baby’s life!

"After Baffy's surgery, we were advised to watch out for any strange lumps. On Sunday, we felt a growth on his chest. A large amount of pus was discharged & today the growth is much smaller. It's good to have Baffy checked by Dr Dennis Choi so we have peace of mind. We're thankful he is alright. He's very happy everyday & has put on 3kg!" ~ Gwen

“After Baffy’s surgery, we were advised to watch out for any strange lumps. On Sunday, we felt a growth on his chest. A large amount of pus drained out & today the growth is much smaller. It’s good to have Baffy checked by Dr Dennis Choi so we have peace of mind. So thankful he is alright. He has put on 3kg!” ~ Gwen

Note: An abscess forms when bacteria enters a wound, even a tiny break in the skin. Abscess “pockets” are filled with pus. Depending on the extent of infection, the wound can be properly cleansed, drained and flushed by a vet, and a course of antibiotics prescribed.


Pain is common in pets with cancer, with some tumours causing more pain than others. Our pets may also experience pain associated with cancer treatments such as surgery or chemotherapy. Untreated pain decreases our pet’s quality of life. Read about “Managing Pain In Our Pets”.

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