Cutie: Flash Glucose Monitoring System For Diabetic Pets

Joette with Cutie

how did cutie come into your life?

I was leading a busy and stressful life in the corporate world. The only thing I loved to do was visit the pet farms during my free time. I saw Cutie during one of my visits. She was at the back of the viewing room – her eyes so sorrowful. We both looked at each other for a long time. I could not stop thinking about her. Two weeks later, we brought Cutie home.

living with skin problems

When Cutie developed skin problems, we went to the vet very often but it just got worse. Then I met Dr Simon Quek at one of his talks. We did a skin allergy test to find out what Cutie was reacting to (e.g. pollen, dust mites, tobacco). It can be difficult to avoid exposure to certain environmental allergens. We started Cutie on immunotherapy and it has been working well.

living with blindness

Last year, Cutie was diagnosed with diabetes. Her condition worsened rapidly and within a month, she developed cataracts in both eyes. Cataract surgery was successfully performed by Dr Heng Yee Ling but unfortunately, Cutie developed glaucoma.

It was a very painful and difficult decision to go ahead with enucleation to remove both her eyes. You will find this silly – I actually let Cutie choose from 2 pieces of paper: ‘keep’ or ‘take out’. She kicked the paper with the words ‘take out’.

“We got the Muffin’s Halo to help Cutie get around. Now she is familiar with the surrounding – we do not move or add in new furniture – she can find her way around and even climb up and down the stairs. I guess she ‘activates’ her other senses and decided to move on with life.”

“I learnt something from Cutie: We don’t need a pair of eyes to see the world. We just need a heart to feel it.”

living with diabetes

We are very fortunate to meet Dr Nathalee Prakash and her team – their dedication, patience and commitment. To reduce stress in Cutie, Dr Prakash introduced us to a glucose monitoring device that is implanted into Cutie’s neck – no more poking of needles to draw blood.

Application of the sensor is relatively quick, painless and well-tolerated by diabetic patients.

“Now we can monitor Cutie’s blood glucose with ease at home. Cutie is the first dog to use this sensor!”

flash glucose monitoring system 

Effective blood glucose (BG) monitoring is essential for the management of dogs and cats with diabetes mellitus. BG readings can be affected by stress, food consumption and exercise. BG testing in a vet clinic can be stressful for our pets, especially cats. Under stressful conditions, the values obtained may not be an accurate reflection of the BG curve on a typical day.

A novel Flash Glucose Monitoring System is now available to measure interstitial tissue glucose levels every minute via a disposable sensor with a small catheter inserted under the skin. It can be worn for up to 14 days and eliminates the need for repeated blood tests at the vet clinic. The readings are collected, registered and stored automatically. Email mpvc@mountpleasant.com.sg or call 6251 7666 to find out more.

For patients living with diabetes, consistent, unchanging and constant are keywords to remember for lifestyle, diet and treatment.

Ideally, a diabetic dog or cat should be fed the same type of food, same amount, at the same time each day. A regular schedule will help minimise fluctuations in blood glucose so that the amount of insulin needed remains the same. Once the diabetes is properly regulated, our diabetic pets like Cutie can live relatively normal lives.


We always welcome medical stories of your animal friends which can educate and inspire others. Email us at comms@mountpleasant.com.sg if you have a story to share. Meanwhile, be part of Mount Pleasant community over at our Website and Facebook.

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