Kiba Travels Back To Motherland For Life-Saving Surgery

At just 8 months young, Kiba the Shiba Inu was diagnosed with a rare congenital heart defect known as Double-Chambered Right Ventricle. He was experiencing fainting spells almost every day and might not live to celebrate his 2nd birthday. But Juliana and Jonathan would not let that happen. They flew to Japan for open-heart surgery — giving their best friend his best chance at life.


what is Double-Chambered Right Ventricle?

Double-chambered right ventricle (DCRV) is a rare congenital heart defect characterised by abnormal fibromuscular bands or membranes within the right ventricle resulting in an obstruction to blood flow out of the right side of the heart.

This obstruction creates increased outflow pressure and workload for the right side of the heart, leading to thickening of the muscle as well as tricuspid regurgitation (back flow of blood through the tricuspid valves).

DCRV diagnosis and clinical signs

Kiba was 8 months young when he was first referred to veterinary specialist Dr Nathalee Prakash at Mount Pleasant Vet Centre (Gelenggang).

According to Juliana, “Kiba was fainting nearly every day (syncope) from anything that excites him, like daily occurrences of us reaching home. We had to quickly hold him firmly before he got too excited. Usually he would collapse on the floor for a few seconds. When it was a bad episode, he would scream and urinate uncontrollably.”

A full diagnostic work-up including radiography, electrocardiography and echocardiography performed by Dr Nathalee Prakash confirmed the diagnosis of DCRV. Clinical signs include exercise intolerance, coughing, panting and fainting.

medical management associated to poorer prognosis

Kiba was initially managed with medication to improve relaxation of the heart muscle and relieve the outflow obstruction which minimised the fainting episodes. However, medical management was associated to a poorer prognosis and meant he was medication dependent. There are also potential side effects such as slowing of heart rate and lowering of blood pressure. If the condition progresses, patients may develop signs of right-sided heart failure (which include fluid in the abdomen, enlarged liver, poor circulation) with increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest.

“Past publications show that in the small number of patients this condition has been documented in, surgery is the preferred option due to an improved lifespan. Furthermore, in the time leading up to Kiba’s surgery, there was some progression on repeated echocardiography, which gave further support that surgery was the right decision despite the risks involved,” says veterinary specialist Dr Prakash.

rigorous screening and quarantine 

There is no veterinary surgeon in Singapore qualified to perform the open-heart surgery on Kiba. His family thus made the huge decision to travel to Japan where Kiba will be operated on by Dr Masami Uechi of JASMINE Veterinary Cardiovascular Medical Center.

In the months leading up to surgery, Kiba had to fulfill export requirements and also go through rigorous screening to ensure he was a suitable candidate for surgery. Juliana explains, “There is a strict requirement for rabies vaccination and a 6-month quarantine before Kiba could travel to Japan. It was stressful to wait and not be able to do anything to improve his condition.”

 

29 June: Kiba with Dr Nathalee Prakash the day before his flight @kiba.shiba

off to japan for a fighting chance

Juliana and Jonathan had visited JASMINE Center in February to meet the team and view the facilities. “We are very relieved that Kiba is finally on his way for surgery after such a long wait. We have total confidence in Dr Uechi and the JASMINE team.”

30 June: “Heading back to my Motherland.” @kiba.shiba

Because love is about going that extra mile

Meeting new friends in Japan. The family arrived 10 days before the scheduled surgery, giving Kiba’s body time to adapt and reduce the level of stress before the procedure.

dcrv OPEN-HEART SURGERY

The aim of cardiac repair is to surgically remove the abnormal muscle bundles dividing the right ventricle into two cavities.  An incision is made in the right ventricle spanning the region of the defect and the location of the obstruction determined by visual inspection and palpation of the right ventricular wall. The fibromuscular membranes are then excised, taking care to avoid injury to the papillary apparatus of the tricuspid valve.

10 July: Open-heart surgery by Dr Masami Uechi and team went smoothly

11 July: “I’m doing pretty well for Day 1. Woke up in the middle of the night with a few drama screams. The surgeons took care of me and I slept through till morning.” @kiba.shiba

Kiba is very fortunate to be in a family who is able to go against all odds to save his life.

“Not every family can afford to give their pet the opportunity to correct a heart condition.  Take your time to do your research if you are purchasing a pet from breeders – ask around, speak with current owners, get to know the parents of the puppies – such congenital health issues should not be taken lightly.”

 

15 July: “I’ve been discharged! Everyone is amazed by my progress.” @kiba.shiba

“We feel extremely relieved that Kiba is no longer fainting. There have been moments when he got too excited and we held our breath and waited for the usual fainting spell – you can see sheer joy on his face when it didn’t happen. We are monitoring his progress closely – when the right time comes, we will know when he is ready for some off leash activity.”

“There is a worldwide community called the Mighty Hearts Project – fellow pet lovers who are there to support families seeking overseas open-heart surgeries for their furballs. It is good to know we are not alone.” ~ Juliana (extreme left) with Kiba

home sweet home

After 25 days in Japan pre-and-post-surgery, the family was ready to fly back to Singapore and continue Kiba’s journey to recovery.

“Mahatma Gandhi said, ‘The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated’. I hope we will continue to pursue better healthcare for our pets and have our very own cardiology specialist in Singapore!” 

26 July: “Good to be back home. My place of comfort.” @kiba.shiba

post-surgery review 

“DCRV surgery in humans is well-researched and published with a high success rate but there is very little data in the veterinary world. The vets at JASMINE Center will continue to monitor Kiba from a distance together with the ever-so-patient Dr Prakash at Mount Pleasant (Gelenggang). Without Dr Prakash’s help over the past months, Kiba might not have made it to Japan for his surgery.”

11 Aug: Post-surgery review and echocardiogram by Dr Nathalee Prakash. Clinically, Kiba has shown marked improvements with a better body condition score, higher energy level, no episodes of fainting.

Welcome home Kiba! L-R: Cash, Dr Keshia Beng, Dr Nathalee Prakash, Rose, Jonathan, Juliana

Juliana and Kiba with his favourite vet nurse Cash

“Kiba definitely has been a strong boy and is totally loving his new life. The journey to recovery is long but he is surrounded by family and friends who will give him much love and support.” Follow Kiba and his family at @kiba.shiba


We welcome medical stories of your animal friends to educate and inspire others. Email us at comms@mountpleasant.com.sg and be part of Mount Pleasant community over at our Website and Facebook.

Advertisements

5 Tips When Travelling With Our Pets

Dr Prabhpreet Kaur, Mount Pleasant Animal Medical Centre (Clementi)

Travelling with your pets? Here are some tips to make it as pleasant as possible for you and your best friends.

1. Prepare early

Some countries require your pets to have certain vaccinations or treatments up to 6 months before travel. Find out the import requirements of the country you are going to – speak to their local embassy or get in touch with the relevant government body. Your pet may need to be quarantined for a period of time. 

Speak to the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore on the export requirements  of your pet from Singapore. Some of the requirements include:

  • ISO-compatible Microchip
  • AVA Export Licence
  • Veterinary Health Certificate
beforeleavingsingapore

Visit AVA for more information on importing & exporting of pets.


2. comply with all requirements before booking flights

This will save you the hassle of changing flights or having to cancel your travel because you cannot meet the import requirements.

InCabin_Pet_300x150

Some airlines allow your pet to travel accompanied as check-in baggage/in-cabin. Otherwise, your pet has to travel unaccompanied as cargo. Whenever possible, book a direct, non-stop flight and avoid holiday or weekend travel. 

3. Get your pet used to travelling in the crate

Shiloh-Website_Departure

The crate should meet IATA standards for travel. Take your pet’s height, length & width to ensure the crate is of a proper & comfortable size for travel. (ref: shilohanimalexpress)

Useful information here -> International Air Transport Association (IATA)

IMPORTANT: Introduce your pets to the crate early – at least a few weeks before travel. Let them sleep or eat in their crates. Also, get them used to drinking from a water bottle or a small water bowl attached to the carrier door.

DO reinforce your pets positively whenever they go near or inside the crate. Reward with food, praise or play, depending on what motivates your pet. Make the crate a fun, relaxing, stress free zone. 

DO NOT make the crate a punishment or time-out zone. You want your pet to like the crate (not fear it) so that he would be as relaxed as possible during flight. 

4. control food intake on day of travel

On the day of travel, feed your pet a light meal and sufficient water approximately 2 hours before loading into the crate. You can help to calm your pet with a familiar scent by placing an unwashed t-shirt, blanket or favourite toy into the crate.

Do not sedate your pets for the travel as it can interfere with their ability to regulate temperature. Many airlines will not accept a sedated or tranquillised pet. 

5. coming back again?

If you are bringing your pet back to Singapore after travel, make sure you meet the requirements for both countries. Singapore is free from rabies and has strict import and quarantine policies to keep it that way.

For info on Veterinary Health Certificate, contact any of our Mount Pleasant clinics. For info on professional pet shippers, visit IPATA.

Safe travels!

Mason on paddle boat

Dr Estella Liew’s Mason knows all about travelling. He had flown thousands of miles from USA to Singapore!