Cutie: Flash Glucose Monitoring System For Diabetic Pets

Joette with Cutie

how did cutie come into your life?

I was leading a busy and stressful life in the corporate world. The only thing I loved to do was visit the pet farms during my free time. I saw Cutie during one of my visits. She was at the back of the viewing room – her eyes so sorrowful. We both looked at each other for a long time. I could not stop thinking about her. Two weeks later, we brought Cutie home.

living with skin problems

When Cutie developed skin problems, we went to the vet very often but it just got worse. Then I met Dr Simon Quek at one of his talks. We did a skin allergy test to find out what Cutie was reacting to (e.g. pollen, dust mites, tobacco). It can be difficult to avoid exposure to certain environmental allergens. We started Cutie on immunotherapy and it has been working well.

living with blindness

Last year, Cutie was diagnosed with diabetes. Her condition worsened rapidly and within a month, she developed cataracts in both eyes. Cataract surgery was successfully performed by Dr Heng Yee Ling but unfortunately, Cutie developed glaucoma.

It was a very painful and difficult decision to go ahead with enucleation to remove both her eyes. You will find this silly – I actually let Cutie choose from 2 pieces of paper: ‘keep’ or ‘take out’. She kicked the paper with the words ‘take out’.

“We got the Muffin’s Halo to help Cutie get around. Now she is familiar with the surrounding – we do not move or add in new furniture – she can find her way around and even climb up and down the stairs. I guess she ‘activates’ her other senses and decided to move on with life.”

“I learnt something from Cutie: We don’t need a pair of eyes to see the world. We just need a heart to feel it.”

living with diabetes

We are very fortunate to meet Dr Nathalee Prakash and her team – their dedication, patience and commitment. To reduce stress in Cutie, Dr Prakash introduced us to a glucose monitoring device that is implanted into Cutie’s neck – no more poking of needles to draw blood.

Application of the sensor is relatively quick, painless and well-tolerated by diabetic patients.

“Now we can monitor Cutie’s blood glucose with ease at home. Cutie is the first dog to use this sensor!”

flash glucose monitoring system 

Effective blood glucose (BG) monitoring is essential for the management of dogs and cats with diabetes mellitus. BG readings can be affected by stress, food consumption and exercise. BG testing in a vet clinic can be stressful for our pets, especially cats. Under stressful conditions, the values obtained may not be an accurate reflection of the BG curve on a typical day.

A novel Flash Glucose Monitoring System is now available to measure interstitial tissue glucose levels every minute via a disposable sensor with a small catheter inserted under the skin. It can be worn for up to 14 days and eliminates the need for repeated blood tests at the vet clinic. The readings are collected, registered and stored automatically. Email mpvc@mountpleasant.com.sg or call 6251 7666 to find out more.

For patients living with diabetes, consistent, unchanging and constant are keywords to remember for lifestyle, diet and treatment.

Ideally, a diabetic dog or cat should be fed the same type of food, same amount, at the same time each day. A regular schedule will help minimise fluctuations in blood glucose so that the amount of insulin needed remains the same. Once the diabetes is properly regulated, our diabetic pets like Cutie can live relatively normal lives.


We always welcome medical stories of your animal friends which can educate and inspire others. Email us at comms@mountpleasant.com.sg if you have a story to share. Meanwhile, be part of Mount Pleasant community over at our Website and Facebook.

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Happy Father’s Day Cary!

He may first appear to be a man of few words. Get to know him better and you will see the limitless knowledge he carries within. And a big genuine heart that wins over colleagues, clients and patients. In the words of his team mates at Mount Pleasant (Farrer), this man is patient, reliable, humble yet comical. He is not just a colleague but a counsellor, father figure, living encyclopaedia and Captain America! Happy Father’s Day Cary!

” I believe, with my role, I can make a difference and touch the lives of not only our patients but also their owners.” ~ Cary with Big Man

“Aaahhh…with that special touch, you can ‘cary’ me all day long!” ~ Blue

“The best part of my job is the ability to help our patients feel or get better. Another thing I love about my job is the people I work with.”

“Our life priorities completely change after starting a family.”

Jennifer and two bundles of joy!

“To be a good father, you need patience. Lots and lots of patience. When life gets tough, you just have to roll with the punches!”


Now here are tributes from some of Cary’s team mates at Mount Pleasant (Farrer)!

“Cary is reliable and understanding. He is our Captain America!” ~ Nelson

“Cary is just like a father to us.” ~ Kerry May

“Cary is such a patient and good teacher. He is also very humble.” ~ Dr Daphne Low

“Cary is a great fatherly figure in the clinic! Knowledgeable and trustworthy, but grounded and comical. Someone we can always count on!” ~ Dr Teo Jia Wen

“Cary is an excellent team leader and father figure to our team.” ~ Dr Heng Yee Ling

“Cary is not just my colleague and senior but also my adviser, my counsellor. I don’t only ask him about work matters but also seek his advice on personal matters like how to handle a growing kid. He is one of a kind. When it comes to knowledge, he is a living encyclopaedia – he knows every single thing! That’s our Cary.” ~ Emz

Mount Pleasant Gives Back 2016

We believe in GIVING BACK TO COMMUNITY. Under our initiative #MountPleasantGivesBack, we help the people who are helping our community animals. From December 2016, our 9 clinics provided free medical treatment and sterilisation to over 60 animals from various animal welfare groups and independent rescuers.

Unspayed female dogs come into their first heat at around 6 months old. The cycle usually occurs twice a year with 4 to 6 puppies (sometimes 10) per litter from a Singapore Special. If animal welfare groups like SOSD are not actively trapping and sterilising our street dogs, we will be flooded with puppies!

Dr Cheryl Ho, Dr Germaine Lee and team from Mount Pleasant Central (Whitley) sterilised Pipi and Elliot as part of #MountPleasantGivesBack. It was great to see volunteers, transporters, feeders and vets coming together to help our community animals. Pipi has been released back to site. Elliot is safe at the shelter after his pups were tragically crushed by heavy vehicles.

SOSD has more than 70 pups waiting for homes. But remember, pets are not just for the holidays. If you can’t commit for a lifetime, perhaps volunteer at the shelters. Or simply, spread the word.

The Jurong Island project is a collaboration between SOSD Singapore, ACRES and Noah’s Ark CARES to sterilise and rehome stray dogs on the island.

Dr Eric Yeoh, Mount Pleasant (Changi), made a trip to Jurong Island to vaccinate and microchip 26 adorable wriggly puppies!

A microchip (about the size of a rice grain) encodes a unique identification number.  It is implanted just under the skin between your pet’s shoulder blades.  Should your pets lose their way, vets can scan them to retrieve the microchip number and contact you via a database. You can register your pet’s microchip details with AVA and PetCall.

We salute all hardworking volunteers whose greatest wish is for more dogs, like chubby Doc, to find good homes!

“Gigi and her family were living in Mandai few years ago before the land was cleared. They had nowhere to go. We took them back to our shelter.”

For many years, Noah’s Ark CARES has been sterilising and rescuing injured or sick street dogs on mainland and recently Jurong Island. With urgent cases and limited funds, some dogs have to wait their turn. Gigi’s caregivers tried their best but her skin condition did not improve.

Dr Simon Quek and team at Mount Pleasant (Clementi) helped Gigi with blood tests and skin scrapings. Gigi went back with medications and shampoo to treat the allergies and secondary bacterial and fungal infection. 

Gigi looking better at her review with new fur sprouting all over. She still has a long way to go but at least she is on the right track!

With more than 100 rescued rabbits looking for homes, House Rabbit Society Singapore (HRSS) strongly advocates sterilisation, education and adoption.

Dr Heng Yee Ling and team at Mount Pleasant (Farrer) sterilised 10 beautiful bunnies for HRSS. One bunny, Speedy, was scheduled for a spay but turns out to be a boy!

Male rabbits can be castrated around 4 months when their testicles descend into the scrotal sacs. Cryptorchid rabbits like Speedy have testicles retained in the abdominal cavity, with an increased risk of testicular torsion or cancer. Dr Daphne located the very small undescended testicles and successfully sterilised Speedy.

Chubby Paisley, in Dr Joanna Goh’s arms, was given up when her owner couldn’t make a lifetime commitment. Speedy, with Dr Daphne Low, was rejected by a petshop. No one will buy a rabbit with splayed legs. Contact HRSS if you can commit to Paisley, Speedy and friends!

Honey and Candy

If we can be anything in the world, be a giver. For 50 years, Mdm Chua has been giving her life and love to community animals. She and her daughter Suan Eng are caring for homeless dogs and cats on the streets and in shelters. Every single day.

Dr Audrey Loi and team at Mount Pleasant (East) are glad to give Mdm Chua some support by sterilising their rescued cats Honey, Candy, Kitty and Hazy at no cost to them.

Thank you Mdm Chua and Suan Eng for your kindness, sweat, tears and late nights at the shelters. We wish you good health and happiness throughout the new year!

The least we can do to help a Wonder Woman with a gigantic heart and wicked sense of humour is to sterilise some of her community cats.

Dr Chan Munling and team at Mount Pleasant (Bedok) sterilised more than 10 of Thara’s rescued cats under #MountPleasantGivesBack.

Angel, in Thara’s arms, was found sitting next to a prawning pond but unable to eat. Something about her tugged at Thara’s heart. Despite having her hands full, she brought Angel home and nursed her back to health. Casey Bear the ginger boy was “abandoned like trash inside a carrier”.

So what keeps Thara going despite the frustration she feels at times? “When I see pictures of my rescued cats in their forever homes! Knowing I made a difference however small it may be. This and the fact that 60 lives wait for me to wake up every morning. For their sake, I have to keep going for as long as I can.”

Justine is the sole survivor in her litter when Noah’s Ark CARES rescued her. Unfortunately, her right hind leg was already injured in a traffic accident. Over time, with no treatment, the limb became deformed.

Justine was getting by as best as she could but angular limb deformity can lead to painful lameness as the body is carried in an abnormal posture. Justine is still very young. Dr Dennis Choi, Mount Pleasant (Gelenggang), decided to help her under #MountPleasantGivesBack. Watch video of surgery.

Besides radiography, computed tomography (CT) scan was done to obtain a 3D image of Justine’s hindlimb so Dr Dennis Choi can decide on the best surgical correction plan.

The deformed bones were cut and realigned, then held in the correct position with an external skeletal fixator. Pins are placed through skin and bone, then connected externally to a rigid frame.

Over a month, Justine’s right hind limb was straightening out nicely but then, she suffered from a luxating patella and had to undergo a second surgery. At her review 10 days post-surgery, Justine is doing well. We will see her again in 4 weeks’ time and hope she eventually finds herself a forever home!

Mdm Wong’s Shelter and Friends has a simple mission – “Providing care, compassion and hope and giving all animals a chance for leading loved lives”.

Dr Gloria Lee, Dr Kitty Huang and team at Mount Pleasant (Mandai) provided free medical treatment to a senior dog and a newly rescued boy.

Xiao Bai came for a skin check and senior wellness exam. Dr Kitty Huang ran blood tests including total T4 screen to rule out hypothyroid (which can cause skin problems) and SNAP 4Dx to check for heartworm and tick-borne illnesses. All clear!

Stan is a young unsterilised male. Unfortunately he was diagnosed with tick fever and anaemia. He went back to the shelter with medications and was neutered only when his condition was stable. He is currently doing well. 

THANK YOU Rachada and volunteers who give so much time and compassion to our community animals. Support their work!

Cat Welfare Society has been helping community cats since 1999. As Laura from CWS said, “Rescues require a joint effort. If you need help, reach out and let us know who we can put you in touch with. I hope every cat-lover will take an active role in ensuring that our community cats are sterilised so no kitten is born into this type of hardship again.”

Dr Gabrina Goh, Dr Jansen Tano and team at Mount Pleasant (North)  sterilised 3 rescued cats under #MountPleasantGivesBack.

Cleo and her mom were from a household that allowed cats to roam. When some neighbours were unhappy with cats defecating along corridors, Cleo’s ex-owner intended to abandon their cats at the void deck. CWS mediators stepped in and had since rehomed Cleo’s mom.

Amy and Aibi were strays at an industrial area. The management complained about the cat population and planned to have them culled. CWS mediators convinced the management to let some cats stay on while the rest are taken in for rehoming.

With Veron Lau from CWS

To further support the good work of our animal welfare groups, we are selling eco-friendly tote bags at $10 each. All proceeds go towards animal welfare. Tote bags are sold out at Mount Pleasant (North). Get yours from our other 8 clinics listed here.

Mount Pleasant Animal Medical Centre (Clementi)

Mount Pleasant Animal Medical Centre (Farrer)

Mount Pleasant Animal Medical Centre (Bedok)

Mason & Addie representing Mount Pleasant Central (Whitley)!

Super Mommy Dr Kitty Huang: Happy Mother’s Day!

With two very young boys who still wake up at different hours through the night, we salute Dr Kitty Huang’s unwavering passion to rescue and foster homeless cats. Many have found happy homes because she never stops what her very own mom has started. Happy Mother’s Day Dr Kitty. We hope you get the gift you really want – SLEEP! 

Why you choose to be a vet?

A major contributing factor is definitely my mother’s influence. She is a passionate stray cat carer and I always enjoyed tagging along with her during the feeding rounds. During one of these feeding rounds, when I was about 10 years old, we came across a litter of kittens abandoned in the refuse bin to die.

We brought the kittens home to foster and tried to nurse them back to health. Unfortunately, their condition worsen after a few days and we had to bring them to a vet. The vet caringly advised that we were not bottle feeding them enough and the hot water bag meant to keep them warm and comfortable was too hot resulting in minor burns on their paws and skin.

Observing how the vet cared for and helped the kittens back to health, coupled with the passion for animals influenced by my mother, I was inspired to be a vet so I can help and care for these little friends.

what’s the greatest joy and challenge at work?

Without a doubt, the greatest satisfaction is to see my patients get better after their treatments and witnessing improvements in their condition. And of course, the joy and smile on the owner’s face.

Dr Kitty Huang with Dr Loh Hui Qian, Mount Pleasant (Mandai), examining some cats rescued by Cat Welfare Society.

Unfortunately, life is never a bed of roses. Due to varying reasons such as financial constraints, commitment towards care, temperament of patient, and differing views from owners etc., we are not always able to proceed with ideal treatment plans.

” It can be frustrating and challenging when the ideal treatment plan needs to be altered. In the end, all we want is to keep our patients comfortable and give them a good quality of life.”

what’s the Toughest part of being a working mum?

Juggling between work and quality family time with my boys and hubby. On top of that, it feels like I am doing After Hours every single night! Waking up multiple times through the night to comfort and make milk for the two boys at different hours is no joke – really tiring!

“I am very lucky to have an understanding boss & supportive team at Mount Pleasant (Mandai). The relatively flexible work shifts definitely help my time management.”

“Most importantly, utmost understanding from hubby and family support in caring for my boys when I am at work or need to work late due to emergencies.”

what’s your sweetest memories of motherhood?

Witnessing all the milestones achieved by my boys and seeing them grow up, mingle and love our resident cats and dogs at home.

any Advice to other working mums?

As much as possible, leave work at work and bring only happiness and positivity back home. Spend quality time with kids and not forgetting the husband! Most importantly, catch up on sleep whenever you can. If I can buy time for sleep – I would!

Super Mommy Dr Clara Chua: Happy Mother’s Day!

To moms, the bell of happiness must sound like children laughing. And perhaps snoring (peace)! Today we celebrate Dr Clara Chua from Mount Pleasant (Changi) who beams with joy and pride of motherhood. Happy Mother’s Day Dr Clara. Cheers to caffeine! 

Why did u choose to be a vet?

I was given 6 chicks when I was 12. They were my first pets. Raising them, I felt empathy for animals. It was then that I decided I wanted a career working with animals. And became vegetarian too!

What is the greatest joy and challenge at work?

I’m most happy when sick pets who are brought in become better. Helping our patients improve and making their owners happy makes me happy. Conversely, when our patients don’t improve despite our best efforts to treat them and we start questioning whether they are suffering in spite of what we are doing – emotionally, it’s a hard situation to be in.

Team Changi winning the Best Clinic Deco for Christmas!

Dr Clara Chua’s furkids – Coco and Nikki

What is the toughest part of being a working mom? 

Coping with lack of sleep – just gotta up the caffeine! I’m fortunate to be able to work part-time so I get to spend more time with my daughter in her early years. I’m also fortunate to be able to leave her with my family on my work days. The rest of the time, my husband helps me out whenever he can.

what is your sweetest memories of motherhood?

Emma’s laughter is the sweetest thing! She’s not a ticklish baby so we really enjoy those rare moments when she finds something that is funny and laughs.

any advice for young married women?

Have children whilst you’re young. The fountain of youth will help cope with reduced hours of sleep and a strong healthy body helps with carrying (the equivalent of) a sack of rice for extended periods of time!

Have a beautiful Mother’s Day, Dr Clara!

ACS (Barker Road) Student Attachment Programme

We believe in educating our community in animal care and veterinary medicine, especially students who are considering the pathways to be a veterinarian.

In November, a group of Secondary 3 boys from ACS (Barker Road) came to “work” at our clinics. Some are so inspired and eager to learn, they came for extra days!


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“I love dogs. Job shadowing in a vet clinic is unique and interesting, not something I can do whenever I want.” ~ Joel Mathews with Mason at Mount Pleasant Central Vet Clinic (Whitley)

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“The most challenging part of being a vet, in my opinion, is having patience and perseverance.”

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“Having patience in handling pets, especially difficult animals. And having perseverance as the doctors need to take on night shifts and perform surgeries which may take a few hours.”

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“The best part of being a vet is the opportunity to work with animals. They bring joy to your working life!”

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“I’m an avid animal lover. Becoming a vet is a very natural choice for me, having been surrounded by animals since I was born. Through this job shadowing opportunity, I had a feel of what a vet’s life is like and learnt to be a better companion to my pets.” ~ Leon Saint Claire with Sophie at Mount Pleasant Vet Centre (Mandai)

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“Sometimes, vets face problems which they have to resolve quickly. They have to think fast and not hesitate. Another challenge is the difficult decision of euthanasia – a life is on the line, for better or for worse. Hence, I feel that vets cannot crack under pressure. They must make the right decisions for the well being of the animal, and also the owner.”

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“Job shadowing strengthened my conviction to be a vet. Seeing an animal’s flame rekindled gives you a sense of satisfaction. You feel joyous for helping the family and improving the life of an animal – be it a bird, cat, hamster or dog. Furthermore, a growing stray population may give rise to more animal abuse. By becoming a vet, I may be able to make a positive difference to this predicament. That’s the beauty of being a vet – it is more than just a job.”

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“I chose to job shadow at a vet clinic as I have a strong interest in animals and have dogs since I was born. We had a Maltese. After he passed, we welcomed Bambi and Belle into our family. They are Labradoodles which we personally chose from England after meeting their parents to check for any hereditary issues.” ~ Brandon Au Yong with Guan Wei at Mount Pleasant Animal Clinic (East)

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“I love animals and want to help them get better. I have plans to pursue a veterinary degree in Australia. During job shadowing, I learnt how to take better care of my dogs and how to observe their behaviour for signs that they are unwell. I also learnt how various blood test machines work.”

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“The hardest part was to witness blood from certain surgeries or teeth extractions as I associate blood with pain. The vets do their best to relieve pain and perform procedures as quickly as possible. The best part of this whole experience – I was able to interact with animals and help care for them as well as interact with vets and technicians to learn about the industry and their work.”

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“When I was young, we stayed with my extended family and 10 dogs. I love our dogs and my interest lasted through the years till now when only 2 dogs remained.” ~ Michael Boey at Mount Pleasant Vet Centre (Changi)

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“Our dogs are old and have had their fair share of visits to the vet. I’m always interested to learn what goes on in a consultation and when animals are hospitalised. Being a vet is one of my dream jobs.”

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“For an animal lover, the contact with animals is possibly one of the best parts of being a vet. I cannot bear seeing any animal sick. I would want to find out what is affecting them and how we can nurse them back to health.”

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David with Sophie at Mount Pleasant Animal Medical Centre (Bedok)

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Daniel at Mount Pleasant Animal Clinic (North)


Under Mount Pleasant Community Outreach – Education, our programmes include talks at schools and organisations, project collaboration, work experience, student attachments and clinic visits. Email comms@mountpleasant.com.sg to be part of our outreach! 

Stenotic Nares In Flat-Faced Dogs

Brachycephalic dogs and cats such as Pugs, Bulldogs, Pekingeses and Persians are bred to have flat or short faces which puts them at risk of airway obstruction, heat stress and even death.

Brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome (BAOS) refers to the upper airway abnormalities that affects brachycephalic dogs. They include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, hypoplastic trachea and everted laryngeal saccules.

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Mon Mon, 2-year-old Pekingese: A dog with stenotic nares has abnormally narrowed nostrils that restrict the amount of airflow into the nostrils, making it difficult to breathe.

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Rasping breath & snoring is not always “cute”. Your dog may be suffering from respiratory distress.

Air passes from the nostrils through the nasal cavity and back of the throat, and into the trachea via the larynx. A dog with stenotic nares has abnormally narrowed nostrils that restrict the amount of airflow into the nostrils, making it difficult to breathe. Over time, increased airway resistance can cause the larynx to collapse.

Pinch your nostrils slightly with your fingers – experience how difficult it is to breathe. Then imagine breathing this way, 24 hours a day.

SIGNS OF STENOTIC NARES
  • Noisy breathing 
  • Snoring
  • Exercise intolerance
  • Cyanosis (blue gums due to lack of oxygen)
  • Occasional collapse especially after activity/excitement/excessive heat

The increased effort required for breathing can eventually put a strain on the heart.

keep dog at healthy weight
  • If your dog is only mildly affected by stenotic nares, the condition can be managed by keeping him at a healthy weight as obesity worsens the symptoms.
  • Keep your brachycephalic dogs away from stressful situations and avoid exercise in hot humid weather.
  • They may also do better with harnesses instead of collars to avoid putting pressure at the neck area.
“nose job”

If the stenotic nares are severe, rhinoplasty (“nose job”) can be done to widen the nostrils. A wedge of tissue is surgically removed from the walls of each nostril to open up the nasal passage.

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Dr Patrick Maguire, Mount Pleasant Vet Centre (Gelenggang), performed stenotic nares repair & soft palate resection on 5-year-old Barney the Frenchie. As seen in the photos, his nostrils are widened to improve airflow & help him breathe better.

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A wedge of tissue is surgically removed from the walls of each nostril to open up the nasal passage. (Ref: vet4bulldog.com)

soft palate resection

Breathing difficulty in brachycephalic dogs or cats can also be caused by an elongated soft palate which obstructs the opening to the larynx.

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Your bulldog’s palate is located at the roof of the mouth – the front part is the “hard palate” & the back part is the “soft palate”. In brachycephalic dogs, their upper jaw has been shortened, forcing the tip of the soft palate into the laryngeal area & partially obstructing the airway. (Image Ref: veazievet.com)

Signs of elongated soft palate
  • Noisy breathing
  • Retching or gagging especially while swallowing
  • Exercise intolerance
  • Cyanosis (blue gums due to lack of oxygen)
  • Occasional collapse especially after activity/excitement/excessive heat

This condition can be corrected by a soft palate resection to remove excessive tissue and allow better airflow from the nose to the windpipe.

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“”Mon Mon was not able to breathe properly when the weather is hot. She couldn’t go out for a walk even if it’s just 5 minutes. When she played with her mate, she was panting a lot. Few weeks ago, she was again struggling to breathe, her tongue turned pale. I rushed to the nearest vet where she received oxygen therapy. The vet advised us to bring her for a surgery which can help her breathe better. So I took Mon Mon to Dr Dennis Choi.” [Evaluating the soft palate]

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After stenotic nares surgery & soft palate resection

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“I know Mon Mon definitely has to go through this surgery (to widen her nostrils) sooner or later or else, one day she might just passed on if she can’t catch her breath. She is recovering well. Now, she can play with her little boyfriend Fibio at home!”

Many brachycephalic animals experience significant improvement in their breathing and overall wellness after the surgeries. 

Stenotic nares and elongated soft palates are congenital malformations. Dogs that require surgery to correct airway obstruction should not be used for breeding. We recommend that these dogs be neutered or spayed during the surgical correction. 

St Margaret’s Secondary School: Student Attachment Programme

A very fulfilling morning at St Margaret’s Secondary School’s Professional Career Guidance Day! Dr Joanna Goh from Mount Pleasant (Farrer) shared about her veterinary journey to almost 100 students while Mach the therapy cat distracted all the girls with his charms. Thank you teachers for organising this meaningful event. We could be looking at some bright future vets here!

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Morning assembly with a token of appreciation from the principal of St Margaret’s Secondary School

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Dr Joanna Goh spoke with almost 100 students, sharing the dreams, realities and pathways to be a veterinarian. We could be looking at some bright future vets here!

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We are pleased to have Belinda Chong and her handsome therapy cat Mach from Cat-Assisted Therapy Singapore – CATS who is easily a distraction!

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We believe in reaching out to our community in various ways. One of which is educating individuals in animal care and veterinary medicine, especially students who are considering the pathways to be a veterinarian.

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Showing the students how an ultrasound scan is performed.

Joswara Ming Hui
4E4, St Margaret’s Secondary School

I am grateful that Dr Joanna Goh came to our school to share on a career in veterinary science. She provided us with information related to the educational pathway for this vocation and her personal experiences in the journey.

The visit to Mount Pleasant (Farrer) was an invaluable experience for me and my school mates. We got to see different components of an animal clinic. I was fascinated by the many rooms, each having its purpose, and the different types of medical equipment.

This has been an unforgettable personal experience. More impactful than reading information off the internet or brochures. I am truly thankful for this opportunity.

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Sometimes the best therapist has fur & 4 legs!

Lua Jin Wen
4E4, St Margaret’s Secondary School

Dr Joanna Goh was very engaging during her sharing on being a veterinarian. She was enthusiastic to help us with our questions. Her insightful sharing which included many interesting and meaningful experiences has greatly inspired me to work towards my goal of joining the profession.

I was also privileged to be invited to visit Mount Pleasant (Farrer) where my school mates and I were met by the friendly and helpful staff. The clinic was bigger than it looked from outside and the whole area was well maintained. It was heartwarming to see the clinic making extra effort to find homes for abandoned animals. We got to see how an ultrasound can be used to examine a dog’s kidney. It was an eye-opening experience.

Seeing the way the staff cared for their animal patients was uplifting. If I have a sick pet, I would definitely bring it to Mount Pleasant for medical attention as I know the staff will do a good job caring for my pet.

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Our education programmes include talks, project collaboration, work experience, student attachments and clinic visits. To be part of our outreach, email comms@mountpleasant.com.sg. We will be delighted to discuss further.

ACS (Barker Road) Teacher Attachment Programme

During the June holidays, we hosted a team of teachers from Anglo-Chinese School (Barker Road) for their staff work attachment programme. Here is what some of them have to say.

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Mount Pleasant Animal Medical Centre (Bedok)

“Thank you very much for having us! One important lesson I’ve learnt from the attachment is how human the whole thing is. People tend to think that vets deal only or mainly with pets but truth is, there’s a lot of interaction with people. The team dynamics at Mount Pleasant (Bedok) is really great. It’s like a family here and the work atmosphere is warm. I enjoyed my time with Dr Chan Munling and team and felt really welcomed!” ~ Ang Puay Khoon

Farrer

Mount Pleasant Animal Medical Centre (Farrer)

“It is a totally different environment from school but yet there are similar features as both are from the service industry where care, safety and passion are important. At Mount Pleasant (Farrer), I learnt the importance of professionalism. This is a close knit community. I did not feel the existence of hierarchy yet everyone knows their role and could work and support one another seamlessly. It’s like an ant colony – the high degree of professionalism allows for a relaxed but high-functioning organisation.” ~ David Wong

Clementi

Mount Pleasant Animal Medical Centre (Clementi)

“I thought it would be interesting to look into an industry of a mixed nature – one that is partly about service, customer relations, yet involves medical knowledge and skills. I have 2 dogs. Adopting a rescued dog from an industrial park was one of the most enriching and meaningful things I’ve done. Through my attachment at Mount Pleasant (Clementi), I learnt that continual improvement is important. One of the conversations Dr Simon Quek had with the other vets was about a food allergy research he was planning to embark on which I thought was interesting. As a vet, or any other professional, it is always important to seek improvement, better processes, explore new research methods and find new solutions.” ~ Samantha Gan

“I always have a keen interest in animal welfare. I used to have a Collie and a Jack Russell Terrier. Presently, I have 3 Morkies (Maltese x Yorkshire Terrier). Through this attachment, I learnt that working in a clinic entails more than just empathy. The team has to be fast, knowledgeable, skilful and up-to-date in animal research. It was a learning experience when I could observe Dr Quek performing surgery.” ~ Alley Eio

North

Mount Pleasant Animal Clinic (North)

“Through my attachment with Dr Sandhya Nair’s team at Mount Pleasant (North), I learnt that vets and technicians require the same dedication as doctors and nurses. In fact, I think they have it tougher as animals are not able to speak about their health problems. Vets also have to deal with many things such as dental and grooming, as well as a variety of animals which can differ greatly. I saw that when the vets and technicians are not attending to animals, they’re constantly learning about medical conditions and mentoring one another. Teamwork is the key to success for every case. I appreciate the kindness the team showed us. They made time in the midst of the busyness, explained to us what they were doing and even taught us medical terms.” ~ Elke Handoyo

East

Mount Pleasant Animal Clinic (East)

“I have a love and curiosity about animals. We used to have 2 rabbits who just hopped into our house and started burrowing in the garden. We took them in and it was nice having them roam free in the yard. For 10 years, they brought us joy. You cannot do anything without passion for a common cause and that’s what everyone at Mount Pleasant (East) has in common. It is a joy to be around professionals who enjoy their work even though it’s hard. Their passion keeps them going. It has certainly inspired me in my own field.” ~ Kenneth Khoo

“I have had many pets over the the years and am always interested to learn how to better care for animals. Through my attachment at Mount Pleasant (East), I learnt that client care is just as important as pet care. The team works very hard, sometimes with few breaks. They are really a committed lot. I have more empathy for vet staff now as I see what they have to deal with.” ~ Raji Ravi

Gelenggang

Mount Pleasant Vet Centre (Gelenggang)

And here we have teacher Clarise Wong with our team at Mount Pleasant (Gelenggang). While we thought we were givng and imparting knowledge to the teachers, we receive much more in return. Clarise has signed up her Chow Chow Xiong Xiong as a Mount Pleasant Hero to save more lives! Find out how your dog and cat can be a heroic blood donor!

AMK

Mount Pleasant Vet Centre (Mandai)

Whitley

Mount Pleasant Central Vet Clinic (Whitley)

Mount Pleasant Gives Back 2015

We believe in giving back to community.

Under our new initiative Mount Pleasant Community Outreach – Animal Welfare, we are delighted to give back to the people who are helping our community animals.

Beginning from Christmas month till January 2016, our clinics provided free medical treatment and sterilisation to over 45 animals from independent rescuers and animal welfare groups like Cat Welfare Society, Animal Lovers League, Noah’ s Ark CARES, House Rabbit Society and Purely Adoptions.

 

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Living with 700 rescued dogs and cats at a no-kill shelter running purely on donations, sometimes you have to wait your turn to see the vet. 15-year-old Kiki from Animal Lovers League – ALL Authorised Page had chronic ear infection with an ulcerated mass which has become impossible for the workers to control. Dr Dennis Choi and team at Mount Pleasant (Gelenggang) were prepared to perform a total ear canal ablation so that Kiki can enjoy her golden years in comfort. Unfortunately, X-rays revealed multiple tumours in her lungs. With her old age, body condition and the fact that multiple lung tumours are usually metastatic, we decided together not to put Kiki through surgery. She might not make it through. ALL had been keeping Kiki happy and comfortable, till she crossed the the rainbow bridge in April.

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Mdm Chua has been helping community animals for 50 years. She and her daughter Suan Eng give a large part of their heart and soul to homeless cats and dogs. Kindness beams from their eyes. ❤️ Female cats come into their first heat at around 6 months. Being polyestrus, they continue the heat cycle every 2 to 3 weeks unless they become pregnant. 1 female cat can produce more than 10 kittens in a year so responsible feeding and active sterilisation is very important. Funds are not easy to come by especially when you work silently behind the scenes. Dr Pauline Fong and team at Mount Pleasant (Changi) sterilised Mdm Chua’s rescued cats under #mountpleasantgivesback. Together, we can reduce stray over-population and improve the lives of animals, pet or rescue!

whitley

Cat Welfare Society has been helping community cats since 1999. Strong in their belief that population control is best done through education and ultimately sterilisation – not destruction. “At Cat Welfare Society, we believe every cat should live a life free from fear and suffering. This is why we exist, to help those who can’t help themselves.” Dr Cheryl Ho and her team at Mount Pleasant Central Vet Clinic (Whitley) supported CWS’ mission by providing free sterilisation for community cats. We hope our efforts brought some relief to Thenuga and her CWS team.

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Over 2 months, Dr Cheryl Ho and team at Mount Pleasant (Whitley) sterilised 20 community cats for Cat Welfare Society under Trap-Neuter-Release-Manage (TNRM). It has been such a blessing to give back! Thank you for trusting us to take care of your best friends.

clementi

Noah’s Ark CARES and Noah’s Ark Natural Animal Sanctuary have been helping animals in Singapore and Malaysia since 1995. Under Project Industrial Dogs (PID), they help control our stray population through sterilisation. Catching strays for sterilisation can be an emotional affair. Especially when the dogs are fearful like Little Brown and don’t understand your intentions. But the work must go on if we hope to prevent unwanted births and unnecessary deaths through culling. Dr Simon Quek and team from Mount Pleasant Animal Medical Centre (Clementi) supported Noah’s Ark by sterilising 5 rescued strays.

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“She is from a scrap metal factory. Previous litter of 6 all died. Many boys were fighting over her. Thank goodness we caught her this time.” Noah’s Ark CARES and Dr Simon Quek’s team at Mount Pleasant (Clementi) rejoice over the news that mommy dog was finally caught and sterilised! No more puppies. Dead or alive. No more injuries from dog fights. One less worry for rescuers. Mommy dog, we wish you a safe and healthy life.

farrer

Since 2002, House Rabbit Society Singapore (HRSS) has been improving rabbits’ lives through education, adoption and sterilisation. Many bunnies are rescued from a life in tiny cages, along corridors, exposed to the elements. Others taken in from the streets, parks, void decks where they were abandoned. In the joy of giving, Dr Heng Yee Ling and team at Mount Pleasant (Farrer) supported HRSS by sterilising 10 bunnies who are ready for rehoming. It takes a community to help community animals. Rescuers, educators, fosterers, vets, nurses and sometimes Flash the resident cat who watches over the bunnies after surgery.

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Button, ex-breeding farm dog. Dirty, smelly, bad teeth, long nails, dangling teats from having several litters, pus dripping from vagina. She is one of the forgotten ones, rescued from a dreary life, a puppy-making machine. And sadly, she is considered “not so bad” compared to other rescues. Dr Chan Munling and her team at Mount Pleasant (Bedok) supported the selfless work of the rescuer by spaying and treating Button for free. 11 teeth were extracted. Blood tests were done to ensure Button is healthy and ready to be rehomed.

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Last year, Winnie’s adopted dog Happy went through surgery to remove a thyroid mass. Before that, she had surgeries for cataracts and pyometra. Despite the finances committed to Happy, Winnie still cares for community cats. Especially when an elderly strayfeeder passed on. As part of #mountpleasantgivesback, Dr Sandhya Nair and team at Mount Pleasant Animal Clinic (North) sterilised Mao Mao, a new cat in Winnie’s community. Spaying helps to control our pet population, prevents diseases of the reproductive tract and reduces the chances of mammary cancer. We appreciate responsible caregivers like Winnie. Thank you for helping Mao Mao and friends!

ahboy

Unneutered male cats tend to roam, spray foul-smelling urine and get into fights over females and territories. That’s exactly what happened with Ah Boy. Siew Kheng has rescued and rehomed several community cats. She noticed this new cat with an injured eye and brought him to Mount Pleasant Animal Clinic (North) for treatment. Ah Boy is sterilised under #mountpleasantgivesback and stayed indoors until he was fit to be released to the community. Neutered cats are less likely to develop prostate cancer, perineal hernia or hormone-induced cancers. Thanks to responsible caregivers like Siew Kheng, Ah Boy will live a longer, happier and healthier life!

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When 10-year-old Snow the Cocker Spaniel was given up by her family in December, she had urinary tract infection, bad skin, ears and eyes. With TLC from Purely Adoptions and her fosterer, Snow was already looking much better. Dr Gloria Lee, Dr Kitty Huang and team at Mount Pleasant Vet Centre (Mandai) performed a cystotomy to remove 2 large stones in Snow’s bladder. “Snow is our rescue case now and we will look for a good home for her. We do our best for every dog.” The new year is the best time for second chances. We are delighted to give back to rescuers like Purely Adoptions and be part of Snow’s new chapter in life. She’s one of the sweetest girls ever.